Codes for a Safe and Happy New Year

Codes for a Safe and Happy New Year

It’s been established that the holidays—roughly the period between Thanksgiving and New Year’s—can be hazardous to one’s health. Hospitals experience staffing shortages, people engage in riskier behavior, and large swaths of the country battle blizzards and arctic blasts that leave them scrambling. As you traverse icy highways to be with friends and family this season, the Journal of AHIMA encourages you to remember: safety first! And it couldn’t hurt to commit some of these codes to memory. Happy holidays!

 

Latkes are a traditional Hanukkah dish, often served with sour cream or applesauce. For best results, cooks are encouraged to fry these delectable potato pancakes in rendered chicken fat. But beware: the sizzle that makes them delicious can also be hazardous to arms and hands!

Codes:

  • T22.211A – Second degree burn of right forearm
  • T22.212A – Second degree burn of left forearm
  • X10.2XXA – Burn from hot cooking oil
  • Y93.G3 – Cooking (activity)
  • Y92.030 – This occurred in the kitchen of the apartment the person lives in

 

A German and Polish Advent tradition celebrating the feast day of St. Nicholas, the patron saint of children, dictates that children put their shoes—or a boot—next to their front doors on the evening of December 5. Kids who have been good all year can expect to find presents in their shoes when they wake up the next morning. Ol’ St. Nick, however, may trip over the shoes in the dark if he’s not careful!

Codes:

  • S93.401A – Right ankle sprain
  • W18.09XA – Tripped over shoes and fell
  • Y92.010 – Tripped/fell by the kitchen door

 

The English tradition of “wassailing” dates back to the Middle Ages when groups of merry-makers went door to door spreading good cheer through song and warm beverages—often mulled cider, wine, or mead. Wassailing celebrated the “Twelfth

Night”—or Epiphany Eve, marking the end of the Christmas season. The Americanized version of this tradition, of course, is Christmas caroling—which often is celebrated with cocktails.

Codes:

  • F10.129 – Alcohol intoxication
  • Y93.89 – Caroling
  • Y92.414 – On public residential street

 

 

The eight-day Jewish holiday Hanukkah commemorates the victory of the Maccabees over the larger Syrian army and the miracles that took place during this time—namely, that one day’s supply of oil lasted eight days and nights. This year Jews will start lighting their menorahs on December 22, that is, unless they have an electric version.

Codes:

  • T23.121A – First-degree burn of single right finger
  • X08.8XXA – Burn from matches
  • Y93.89 – Lighting menorah candles
  • Y92.021 – This occurred in the dining room of the mobile home the person lives in

 

AHIMA’s home office is located in Chicago, which, according to CityLab, is a hotbed of “ice carnage.” An Apple store, which AHIMA staffers can gaze upon from their desks, has been particularly problematic  during freeze and thaw cycles. Ice and snow have been known to melt off its sloping roof in sheets, prompting the city to blanket the “town square” area surrounding the store with Chicago’s ubiquitous “watch for falling snow and ice” signs.

Codes:

  • S41.042A – Puncture wound of left shoulder with foreign body
  • W20.8XXA – Struck by falling icicle
  • Y92.59 – Occurred outside an office building

 

 

 

One element of the African-American holiday Kwanzaa, which was established by Dr. Maulana Karenga, professor and chairman of Black Studies at California State University, in 1966, emphasizes observance of African harvest celebrations. Traditional dishes served at these celebrations frequently included okra, black-eyed peas, yams, greens, and peanuts.

Codes:

  • T78.05XA – Anaphylactic reaction to nuts
  • T78.01XA – Anaphylactic reaction to peanuts
  • Z91.010 – Allergy to peanuts
  • Z91.018 – Allergy to nuts
  • Y93.89 – Eating holiday dessert
  • Y92.511 – This occurred while eating out in a restaurant

 

For as long as candy canes have existed there have been children determined to turn them into weapons. Urban Dictionary has identified this phenomenon with a definition for “candy cane swords,” or “A candy cane with a very pointy, very sharp end that could probably puncture skin due to someone sucking on said candy cane repeatedly for some time.”

Codes:

  • S71.132A – Puncture wound of upper left leg
  • W26.8XXA – Puncture due to sharp object
  • Y93.83 – Rough housing and horseplay
  • Y92.211 – This occurred in the elementary school

 

Magic is the only explanation for Santa Claus’s ability to deliver presents to millions of kiddos the world over, in a single evening. It’s also the only possible rationale for how an elderly man with a stomach “like a bowl full of jelly” can shimmy down chimneys without getting stuck or wreaking havoc with fireplaces. Ho, ho, ho!

Codes:

  • J70.5 – Smoke inhalation
  • X02.1XXA – Exposure to fire/smoke
  • Y92.018 – This occurred in the family room – smoke from fireplace
  • W23.1XXA – Stuck in the chimney

 

 

 

Mary Butler is associate editor at Journal of AHIMA.

1 Comment

  1. Very clever! Thx for the chuckle. 🙂

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