Mardi Gras Safety Tips: Coding Mardi Gras Accidents

New Orleans is world-famous for its spectacular, lavish Mardi Gras celebrations. “Fat Tuesday” is a time for celebrants to let loose and indulge before a quieter time of reflection and restraint during Ash Wednesday and Lent.

Decked out in sparkling masks and the traditional colors of gold, green, and purple, Mardi Gras goers can expect to party hard in the streets of New Orleans, calling out for beads from passing floats in one of the many parades. And while safety might not be top of mind for most parade goers, there are a few tips that they should keep in mind to avoid adding a trip to the hospital to their evening’s activities.

Decipher the ICD-10 Code Meanings

Parade goers might be eager to get as close to the floats as possible. And it’s no wonder—they’re intricate works of art that fascinate and delight year after year. What’s more, the float riders are often throwing out free souvenirs to the crowd—anything from beaded necklaces to candy or toothbrushes. But standing too close comes with its hazards, too.

Pedestrians want to make sure they’re paying attention to where the floats are at all times, in order to avoid V09.3XXXA. They also may want to take care if they decide to follow a float along the parade route. Getting distracted trying to frame the perfect Instagram shot on their phones could lead parade goers straight to W22.02XA. Or while walking through the crowd they might forget to pay attention to their footing and W18.41 or W01.0XXA if too many beaded necklaces are strewn on the ground ahead of them.

But those beads don’t just pose a danger when they’re making the ground a little more slippery. As necklaces are being flung from balconies and floats, or even swung around at eye-level by others in the crowd on the streets, S05.11XA is an all too common occurrence. In fact, S05.00 is a real possibility. To avoid such an injury, it’s suggested that parade goers consider some protective eyewear, such as sunglasses. Goggles might not even be a bad idea.

As the crowds grow and the revelry causes people to pay less attention to their surroundings, injuries such as S93.401A or S20.222A could occur as a result of W52.XXXA. In order to keep their wits about them and avoid these possibilities, revelers might want to moderate their portions of celebratory libations. This could also help them avoid T51.OX1A later that night, or R11.2 and R51 the next morning as a result of F10.129.

In the spirit of Fat Tuesday, celebrants may be anxious to get second and third helpings of gumbo and king cakes. K30 might await them the next morning after these indulgences, but they have all year to recover.

Answers
  • V09.3XXA, Pedestrian injured in unspecified traffic accident, initial encounter
  • W22.02XA, Walked into lamppost, initial encounter
  • W18.41, Slipping, tripping and stumbling without falling due to stepping on object
  • W01.0XXA, Fall on same level from slipping, tripping and stumbling without subsequent striking against object, initial encounter
  • S05.11XA, Contusion of eyeball and orbital tissues, right eye, initial encounter
  • S05.00, Injury of conjunctiva and corneal abrasion without foreign body, unspecified eye
  • S93.401A, Sprain of unspecified ligament of right ankle, initial encounter
  • S20.222A, Contusion of left back wall of thorax, initial encounter
  • W52.XXXA, Crushed, pushed or stepped on by crowd or human stampede, initial encounter (circumstance causing an injury)
  • T51.OX1A, Toxic effect of ethanol, accidental (unintentional), initial encounter (alcohol poisoning)
  • R11.2, Nausea with vomiting, unspecified
  • R51, Headache
  • F10.129, Alcohol abuse with intoxication, unspecified
  • K30, Functional dyspepsia (indigestion)

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